Posts Tagged ‘solar flares’

Magnitude-4.2 Earthquake hits North of Oklahoma City

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A magnitude-4.2 earthquake hit north of Oklahoma City early Friday, the latest in a series of quakes that have rattled the state at an increasing rate in the past few years.

There was no immediate word of injuries or damage after the quake hit around 5:40 a.m. Friday near Edmond, Okla. The quake was centered about 16 miles north of Oklahoma City.

The increase in quakes in the state has been linked to oil and gas production, according to state and federal scientists.

In 2012, the state experienced just a few dozen magnitude-3.0 or greater earthquakes. That number skyrocketed to more than 800 in 2015, according to the Associated Press.

Many of the quakes have occurred in swarms near areas where deep well injection operations — which pump wastewater from oil and gas production into the earth — are taking place.

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Solar activity data for this time period – courtesy of http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

2016 Opens with Extreme Weather, Solar Storm

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As 2015 fades into history, storms are triggering chaotic weather and causing severe destruction in parts of the globe.

Here’s a closer look at areas most impacted:

United States: Historic flooding in St. Louis, Mo., forced authorities to shut down a second major highway, Interstate 55, on Thursday morning. High water rushed southward, threatening more flooding in southern Missouri and Illinois,Tennessee and Mississippi.

The flooding has left at least 20 people dead in Missouri and Illinois, mostly involving vehicles that drove onto swamped roadways.

Flooding along the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas and Meramec rivers “will have communities dealing with long-duration high water,” according to Alex Sosnowski, senior meteorologist for AccuWeather.com.

Europe: Flood warnings remained in place in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland on Thursday after Storm Frank’s heavy rain and strong winds battered parts of Britain.

The government-affiliated Environment Agency said more than 6,700 homes in northern England were flooded during the last week as river levels reached all-time highs.

South America: More than 160,000 have been displaced in Paraguay, Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil over the last week by what is being described as the heaviest floods to strike South America in 50 years, Al Jazeera reports. The floods have caused at least eight deaths, according to the news organization.

Meantime, a massive solar storm hit earth Thursday, triggering a display of Northern lights in some of the northern latitudes. It was the result of a powerful M1.9 class solar flare eruption on the sun. (Sources: USA Today, Al Jazeera and AccuWeather.)

Solar Activity Could Cause Lightning Storms On Earth

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A link has been found between storms in the atmosphere of the sun and those here on Earth, but not in the direction expected. The discovery could improve weather forecasting and save the lives of people who might otherwise be trapped in the open during electrical events.
The sun spits out charged particles that hit our atmosphere two to four days later at 1.5-.2.7million kph, but it does not do so evenly. “The solar wind is not continuous, it has slow and fast streams. Because the Sun rotates, these streams can be sent out behind each other – so if you have a fast solar wind catching up with a slow solar wind, it causes a concentration to occur,” says Dr Christ Scott of the University of Reading. The slow phase is composed similarly to the solar corona while fast particles have a composition close to that of the photosphere, the outer layer of the sun that produces the light.
The arrival of bursts of particles trigger the aurora borealis and australis, but Scott has found a correlation with lightning strikes as well, revealed in Environmental Research Letters. The connection may not been spotted before because electrical activity can last for more than a month after the arrival of a large dose of particles.
Scott found a 31% increase in average lightning strikes over central England (422 to 321) in the 40 days after major solar wind events compared to the days beforehand. Lightning peaked 12-18 days after the wind’s arrival. A matching increase in thundery days provided supporting evidence. Since satellite observations can pick up the conditions for such events weeks beforehand there is potential for long term forecasting of when the danger of lightning is highest.
“It’s unexpected,” Scott told the BBC. “Because these streams of particles bring with them an enhanced magnetic field – and this shields Earth from the very high-energy cosmic rays from outside of the Solar System.” The reduction in cosmic rays is only around 1%, but still noticeable. Cosmic rays emitted by supernovae are thought to trigger lighting strikes, and it was expected that the shielding effect of the solar wind would cause a reduction in lightning, rather than an increase. The solar wind particles, while more numerous, are also lower energy than those from cosmic rays, and therefore not as likely to have trigger the cascade of runaway electrons thought to link cosmic rays to lightning.  Moreover, past studies have found sunspot numbers negatively correlate with thunder days in other parts of the world.
If the relationship can be settled the implications are significant. Lightning is estimated to cause 24,000 deaths and ten times as many injuries each year worldwide. Even a small improvement in our capacity to predict it could save lives.
High speed streams were found to occur after periods when the sun was putting out less light, but sunspot numbers increased. Scott and his fellow authors attribute this to the streams coming from an active region appearing on the eastern side of the sun.
In addition to these puzzles Scott says we have plenty to learn about how solar energetic protons (SEPs) interact with the atmosphere. “We propose that these particles, while not having sufficient energies to reach the ground and be detected there, nevertheless electrify the atmosphere as they collide with it, altering the electrical properties of the air and thus influencing the rate or intensity at which lightning occurs,” Scott said.

Inevitably those who deny human involvement in climate change will seize on the findings as evidence that warming is driven by changes in the sun. However, such claims have been comprehensively refuted on numerous occasions. Sun spots and solar flares experience a strong 11 year cycle. If these, or anything correlating with them, were the major drivers of planet-wide temperature changes we would see a much stronger pattern over this cycle than we do.

Cycles of War or Peace are Tied to Cycles of the Sun

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by Dr. Buryl Payne – National Council on Geocosmic Research

A growing number of scientists, health care professionals, and concerned citizens argue that these invisible frequencies are responsible for a host of various health problems. Meanwhile, the largest polluter has gone unnoticed: the Sun. At certain times, the Sun’s activity can also aggravate mental health problems.

Every 10-11 years, the number of sunspots found on our closest star rise from 0 (as it is currently in 2008) to a high of over 400. While the sunspots themselves don’t affect Earth, the solar flares and other disturbances emanating from our Sun during increased sunspot activity result in an increased number of particles (electrons and protons) and harmful light radiation (ultraviolet and x-rays), known as solar wind. If it weren’t for Earth’s protective magnetic field and atmosphere, this bombardment of particles would burn us to a crisp.

Equation: Sunspots => Solar Flares => Magnetic Field Shift => Shifting Ocean and Jet Stream Currents => Extreme Weather and Human Disruption (mitch battros)

Fortunately, our planet’s magnetic field diverts most particles into a circular path around the Earth. Like weather patterns found on Earth, solar wind patterns can change rapidly. Luckily, our planet’s magnetosphere quickly responds to the threat and absorbs the impact, wiggling and jiggling in the process. Geophysicists call this reaction a geomagnetic storm, but because of how it disrupts the Earth’s magnetic field, it could also be called electromagnetic pollution.

These storms, although minute, affect brain waves and hormone levels, causing a number of different reactions, predominately in males. While a few women may also experience changes during these storms, they generally seem less affected by the Sun’s behavior.

We too have magnetic fields which surround each of us. I think it is not unrealistic to conjecture what is happening “externally” is also happening “internally”. I believe current science will acknowledge this notion, showing the Sun’s “charged particles” and its influence on Earth’s magnetic field is the impetus of change. In-like, this same causal effect occurs with human magnetic fields ushering in a change or “transition”. Perhaps this is what our Mayan elders are trying to tell us

Reacting to changing hormone levels, some men may become increasingly irritable and aggressive, while others may instead become more creative. An increase in solar activity is found to increase psychotic episodes in individuals who already suffer from unstable psychological states. While we might relate such behavior to a full moon, in 1963, Dr. Robert Becker and his colleague, Dr. Freedman, demonstrated that solar changes also lead to a noticeable increase in psychotic activity.

Yet these reactions are not simply isolated to a few particularly sensitive or unlucky individuals. Evidence indicates that wars and international conflicts most often break out when sunspots are rapidly forming or rapidly decaying, as these are times when there are more intense geomagnetic storms.  

In addition, this increase in solar activity also correlates to periods of more accidents and illness, as well as an increase of crimes and murders. The entire biosphere is affected by this electromagnetic pollution, and human behavior seems to react accordingly.


Studies of how the Earth’s environment interacts with space and the solar wind are far more than an academic exercise. They are important in shaping the environment we enjoy today – and whether we enjoy it in the dark.

The solar wind and space plasma storms induce massive electrical currents that can affect power systems on the ground, especially in the north. A large storm in 1989 induced currents in the American northeast that caused a failure in the Hydro-Quebec power system that deprived 6 million people of power for over 9 hours in Canada and the United States. The same storm expanded the upper atmosphere and increased drag on NASA’s Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite which carried valuable specimens of materials in space exposure tests (NASA recovered LDEF before it could re-enter the atmosphere).

Similar storms can set up currents that corrode the metal structure of petroleum pipelines, disrupt satellite and land-based communications, short-circuit satellite electronics, and interfere with navigational systems on ships and aircraft.

We cannot stop geomagnetic storms, but we can understand them and, eventually, predict what their effects may be in time to take measures to protect valuable power grids, satellites, aircraft, and other systems.

Source: http://science.msfc.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/plasma_plume/bullet6.htm


Storm Tracking

Thankfully, not all geomagnetic storms are disruptive. Some are generally beneficial to humans. But over time, these extremes in solar activity may also affect periods of earthly conflict. The data on cycles of war and peace extend back at least 2,500 years. (Some believe that they may be traced even further, but the records are not as reliable.) Although some may argue that it seems as if there is always war somewhere, records show that periods of conflict increase and decrease in nearly regular cycles.

As early as 1915, some scientists were beginning to recognize connections between solar activity and human behavior. This work began with Russian scientist Alexander Chizhevsky, who observed that mass changes in human behavior correlated to sunspot cycles.

In the 1930s, Professor Raymond Wheeler, a historian at the University of Kansas, took this observation one step further. His research afforded numerical rankings to the severity of individual battles correlating to solar cycles.

His data was statistically analyzed by Edward Dewey, who validated the existence of these war cycles. Yet he was unable to make a definite connection with sunspot cycles because the data at that time was insufficient. In the 1980s, with a more detailed analysis of Wheeler’s data, the connection became clear.

Upon close examination of the data, a pattern begins to emerge wherein wars are most likely to start in key points of the sunspot cycle. This is when the geomagnetic activity is changing most rapidly on the upsurge of solar activity, or the downward part of the cycle, when sunspots are rapidly diminishing. In addition we can also see how this affects physiological mechanisms, such as altered brain rhythms and abnormal hormonal levels. In other words, wars are a kind of mass psychosis. ‘War Fever’ is real.

With this in mind, should we view warring behavior as a type of disease? Are the related socio-political or economic factors as much a symptom of solar cycles as the battles they appear to create? And if the data on sunspot cycles points to an impending crisis, how can we best use this knowledge?

When we see the connection to physical mechanisms (electromagnetic pollution), this gives us some predictive insight for when increased aggressions were apt to start. Calculations indicate that we’re due to see another rise in intense solar activity in about two years: September 22, 2010.

As with any disease, if we are aware of the cause, we can take precautions to lessen the symptoms. In past writings on this subject, I have suggested that global meditation might be one tactic for steering this aggressive cycle another way. (More information on this is available at www.buryl.com  )

Imagine how valuable it would be to mankind, or even an individual, if we were able to address a potentially volatile situation by carefully studying the pattern of history. How would this influence our decisions and actions, and how might this change our fate?

Buryl Payne has a Ph.D. in psychology and an M.S. in physics and has written several books and articles on a variety of topics.  He is currently working on a book exploring fifth dimensional consciousness.


References:

  • Battros M.  2005. “Solar Rain: The Earth Changes Have Begun.” Earth Changes Press.
  • Becker, R. 0. and Marino, A. A., “Electromagnetism and Life,” State University of New York Press, P.O. Box 978, Edison, N. J. 08808
  • Friedman, H. and Becker, R.O., “Geomagnetic parameters and Psychiatric Hospital Admissions,” Nature, V. 200, pp 626-628, 1963.
  • Hundhausen, A. J., “Solar activity and the solar wind,” Rev, of Geophysics and Space Physics, 17 (8), 20314-2011.8, 1979.
  • Payne, B. 1986. “The Power of Thought to Influence the Sun, Interim Report.” National Council on Geocosmic Research, Winter-Spring.

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Aurora Borealis Could Appear on New Years Eve

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This year has been definitely full of astronomical surprises. Besides all sorts of discoveries scientists have made, we were also able to see a ‘supermoon’ in September as well as a full moon on Christmas night. And now, to top it all off and finish the year with a bang, the night sky on New Year’s Eve is expected to offer us a light show.

According to NASA on the 28th a sunspot cluster erupted. The eruption lead to an M-class flare heading towards the Earth. Given the extreme UV radiation most of the south half of our planet had a radio blackout.

However, the effects don’t end there. A CME (coronal mass ejection) is moving towards the Earth and according to NASA it should create a light spectacle on the sky. The spectacle, although we will most probably just enjoy the lights, it’s actually a geomagnetic storm.

What will happen is that the solar particles brought by the CME, which are like bubbles of plasma, will impact our atmosphere and generate auroras. If you are lucky enough to be at a higher altitude that moment, you can watch the natural cosmic ‘fireworks’ instead of the ones we’re used to.

However, scientists say it is not certain that the phenomenon will take place. Apparently, it all depends on how powerful the storm is. If it lasts long enough and comes with enough speed to hit the atmosphere, we will be able to see it.

Auroras usually appear at the poles when the solar wind sends charged particles into the upper atmosphere where ionization happens that emits light of different colors.

If we are lucky and the storm is strong enough and lasts until entering our planet’s upper atmosphere we could witness another cosmic show, the last of this year after being sure the full moon on Christmas was going to be the last sky event of the year. Hopefully, next year will bring us as much excitement as this one and we will be able to see many other spectacular cosmic events.

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