Posts Tagged ‘health’

Cycles of War or Peace are Tied to Cycles of the Sun

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by Dr. Buryl Payne – National Council on Geocosmic Research

A growing number of scientists, health care professionals, and concerned citizens argue that these invisible frequencies are responsible for a host of various health problems. Meanwhile, the largest polluter has gone unnoticed: the Sun. At certain times, the Sun’s activity can also aggravate mental health problems.

Every 10-11 years, the number of sunspots found on our closest star rise from 0 (as it is currently in 2008) to a high of over 400. While the sunspots themselves don’t affect Earth, the solar flares and other disturbances emanating from our Sun during increased sunspot activity result in an increased number of particles (electrons and protons) and harmful light radiation (ultraviolet and x-rays), known as solar wind. If it weren’t for Earth’s protective magnetic field and atmosphere, this bombardment of particles would burn us to a crisp.

Equation: Sunspots => Solar Flares => Magnetic Field Shift => Shifting Ocean and Jet Stream Currents => Extreme Weather and Human Disruption (mitch battros)

Fortunately, our planet’s magnetic field diverts most particles into a circular path around the Earth. Like weather patterns found on Earth, solar wind patterns can change rapidly. Luckily, our planet’s magnetosphere quickly responds to the threat and absorbs the impact, wiggling and jiggling in the process. Geophysicists call this reaction a geomagnetic storm, but because of how it disrupts the Earth’s magnetic field, it could also be called electromagnetic pollution.

These storms, although minute, affect brain waves and hormone levels, causing a number of different reactions, predominately in males. While a few women may also experience changes during these storms, they generally seem less affected by the Sun’s behavior.

We too have magnetic fields which surround each of us. I think it is not unrealistic to conjecture what is happening “externally” is also happening “internally”. I believe current science will acknowledge this notion, showing the Sun’s “charged particles” and its influence on Earth’s magnetic field is the impetus of change. In-like, this same causal effect occurs with human magnetic fields ushering in a change or “transition”. Perhaps this is what our Mayan elders are trying to tell us

Reacting to changing hormone levels, some men may become increasingly irritable and aggressive, while others may instead become more creative. An increase in solar activity is found to increase psychotic episodes in individuals who already suffer from unstable psychological states. While we might relate such behavior to a full moon, in 1963, Dr. Robert Becker and his colleague, Dr. Freedman, demonstrated that solar changes also lead to a noticeable increase in psychotic activity.

Yet these reactions are not simply isolated to a few particularly sensitive or unlucky individuals. Evidence indicates that wars and international conflicts most often break out when sunspots are rapidly forming or rapidly decaying, as these are times when there are more intense geomagnetic storms.  

In addition, this increase in solar activity also correlates to periods of more accidents and illness, as well as an increase of crimes and murders. The entire biosphere is affected by this electromagnetic pollution, and human behavior seems to react accordingly.


Studies of how the Earth’s environment interacts with space and the solar wind are far more than an academic exercise. They are important in shaping the environment we enjoy today – and whether we enjoy it in the dark.

The solar wind and space plasma storms induce massive electrical currents that can affect power systems on the ground, especially in the north. A large storm in 1989 induced currents in the American northeast that caused a failure in the Hydro-Quebec power system that deprived 6 million people of power for over 9 hours in Canada and the United States. The same storm expanded the upper atmosphere and increased drag on NASA’s Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite which carried valuable specimens of materials in space exposure tests (NASA recovered LDEF before it could re-enter the atmosphere).

Similar storms can set up currents that corrode the metal structure of petroleum pipelines, disrupt satellite and land-based communications, short-circuit satellite electronics, and interfere with navigational systems on ships and aircraft.

We cannot stop geomagnetic storms, but we can understand them and, eventually, predict what their effects may be in time to take measures to protect valuable power grids, satellites, aircraft, and other systems.

Source: http://science.msfc.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/plasma_plume/bullet6.htm


Storm Tracking

Thankfully, not all geomagnetic storms are disruptive. Some are generally beneficial to humans. But over time, these extremes in solar activity may also affect periods of earthly conflict. The data on cycles of war and peace extend back at least 2,500 years. (Some believe that they may be traced even further, but the records are not as reliable.) Although some may argue that it seems as if there is always war somewhere, records show that periods of conflict increase and decrease in nearly regular cycles.

As early as 1915, some scientists were beginning to recognize connections between solar activity and human behavior. This work began with Russian scientist Alexander Chizhevsky, who observed that mass changes in human behavior correlated to sunspot cycles.

In the 1930s, Professor Raymond Wheeler, a historian at the University of Kansas, took this observation one step further. His research afforded numerical rankings to the severity of individual battles correlating to solar cycles.

His data was statistically analyzed by Edward Dewey, who validated the existence of these war cycles. Yet he was unable to make a definite connection with sunspot cycles because the data at that time was insufficient. In the 1980s, with a more detailed analysis of Wheeler’s data, the connection became clear.

Upon close examination of the data, a pattern begins to emerge wherein wars are most likely to start in key points of the sunspot cycle. This is when the geomagnetic activity is changing most rapidly on the upsurge of solar activity, or the downward part of the cycle, when sunspots are rapidly diminishing. In addition we can also see how this affects physiological mechanisms, such as altered brain rhythms and abnormal hormonal levels. In other words, wars are a kind of mass psychosis. ‘War Fever’ is real.

With this in mind, should we view warring behavior as a type of disease? Are the related socio-political or economic factors as much a symptom of solar cycles as the battles they appear to create? And if the data on sunspot cycles points to an impending crisis, how can we best use this knowledge?

When we see the connection to physical mechanisms (electromagnetic pollution), this gives us some predictive insight for when increased aggressions were apt to start. Calculations indicate that we’re due to see another rise in intense solar activity in about two years: September 22, 2010.

As with any disease, if we are aware of the cause, we can take precautions to lessen the symptoms. In past writings on this subject, I have suggested that global meditation might be one tactic for steering this aggressive cycle another way. (More information on this is available at www.buryl.com  )

Imagine how valuable it would be to mankind, or even an individual, if we were able to address a potentially volatile situation by carefully studying the pattern of history. How would this influence our decisions and actions, and how might this change our fate?

Buryl Payne has a Ph.D. in psychology and an M.S. in physics and has written several books and articles on a variety of topics.  He is currently working on a book exploring fifth dimensional consciousness.


References:

  • Battros M.  2005. “Solar Rain: The Earth Changes Have Begun.” Earth Changes Press.
  • Becker, R. 0. and Marino, A. A., “Electromagnetism and Life,” State University of New York Press, P.O. Box 978, Edison, N. J. 08808
  • Friedman, H. and Becker, R.O., “Geomagnetic parameters and Psychiatric Hospital Admissions,” Nature, V. 200, pp 626-628, 1963.
  • Hundhausen, A. J., “Solar activity and the solar wind,” Rev, of Geophysics and Space Physics, 17 (8), 20314-2011.8, 1979.
  • Payne, B. 1986. “The Power of Thought to Influence the Sun, Interim Report.” National Council on Geocosmic Research, Winter-Spring.

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Geomagnetic Storms may Influence Risk of Stroke

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More strokes happen when geomagnetic storms are afoot, according to a new review of stroke literature – although it’s not clear what protective measures anyone could take, researchers said.

Geomagnetic storms happen when the Earth’s magnetic field is disturbed by solar winds or coronal mass ejections, which throw out powerful magnetic fields from the sun.

Among more than 11,000 people who had a stroke, the event was almost 20 percent more likely to happen on days with geomagnetic storms, researchers in New Zealand found.

“The results were a big surprise to us,” said lead author Dr. Valery L. Feigin of the National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences at the School of Rehabilitation and Occupation Studies at Auckland University of Technology.

“What we were particularly surprised with was the size and consistency of the effect of geomagnetic storms on the risk of stroke occurrence, suggesting that geomagnetic storms are significant risk factors for stroke,” Feigin told Reuters Health by email.

The storms can last hours to days, and when strong enough can disrupt satellites and push the aurora borealis much further south than usual, as happened this winter over the United Kingdom.

The electromagnetic upheaval also makes magnetic compasses behave erratically and in 1989, a geomagnetic storm disrupted the Quebec power grid, causing a blackout in the province that lasted nine hours.

Researchers aren’t sure, however, why the storms would be linked to stroke risk.

The review cites six large stroke studies including a total of more than 11,000 patients that took place between 1981 and 2004 in Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

Feigin and his colleagues considered the dates of each participant’s first stroke alongside a record of geomagnetic activity from the same time period from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

For each incident of stroke, researchers compared geomagnetic activity that day with activity on eight other days when the patient did not have a stroke.

According to their results, which are published in the journal Stroke, geomagnetic storms were 19 percent more likely to occur on geomagnetic storm days than on other days.

That is a fairly significant increase in risk, Feigin said, comparing it to the stroke risk associated with taking hormone replacement therapy.

On average, people suffered strokes around age 70, but the connection to geomagnetic storms was stronger for people under age 65.

Over the course of the study, geomagnetic activity didn’t change much from year to year, but it was calmest from 1996 to 1998, which was the period of solar minima in the sun’s 11-year activity cycle, when solar flares and sunspots are least common.

Feigin pointed out that 2014 is a “solar maximum” year.

“There is preliminary evidence suggesting effects of geomagnetic storms on blood pressure increase, variations of heart rhythm and blood clotting abilities, all of which are known risk factors for stroke,” Feigin said, although that’s mostly conjecture at this point.

Earth’s magnetic field differs depending on where you are on the planet, but geomagnetic storms influence the whole magnetic field, and based on this review they seem to affect stroke risk in Europe and Australasia in the same way, he said.

“It’s a fascinating idea, at least on that level,” said Dr. James Brorson, an expert in the evaluation and treatment of stroke in the University of Chicago department of neurology. “I wasn’t aware that this was even postulated.”

A 19 percent increase in stroke risk is enough to make one sit up and take notice, but not as large as the risk increase due to smoking or high blood pressure, he said.

“The idea that geomagnetic storms influence whether or not we have a stroke almost seems like magical thinking,” he said, and it’s certainly too early for people to change their behavior based on the storms.

“Any patient of mine, I would counsel them to by no means worry about this,” Brorson told Reuters Health by phone. “It remains to be seen whether this holds up.”

Besides, he said, geomagnetic storms are not usually very predictable, and even if they were, there’s really nothing anyone can do to avoid them. The Earth’s magnetic field is everywhere, indoors and out.

Although the authors of the review suggest that people at risk for stroke could take extra precautions in magnetically turbulent times, like avoiding stress, excessive alcohol and dehydration, those are measures people should be taking all the time anyway, Brorson said.

“I don’t think that there’s practical significance now, but it’s very fascinating,” he said.

SOURCE: bit.ly/1o5dSnu Stroke, online April 22, 2014.

 

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Manly Hall: Magnetic Fields of the Human Body and Their Functions

Alex Grey the Chakras

Manly Palmer Hall was a Canadian-born author and mystic. He is perhaps most famous for his work The Secret Teachings of All Ages: An Encyclopedic Outline of Masonic, Hermetic, Qabbalistic and Rosicrucian Symbolical Philosophy, which is widely regarded as his magnum opus, and which he published at the age of 27.

He has been widely recognized as a leading scholar in the fields of religion, mythology, mysticism, and the occult.

In 1934, Hall founded the Philosophical Research Society (PRS) in Los Angeles, California, dedicating it to an idealistic approach to the solution of human problems. The PRS claims to be non-sectarian and entirely free from educational, political, or ecclesiastical control, and the Society’s programs stress the need for the integration of philosophy, religion, and science into one system of instruction. The PRS Library, a public facility devoted to source materials in obscure fields, has many rare and scarce items now impossible to obtain elsewhere.

In 1973 (47 years after writing The Secret Teachings of All Ages), Hall was recognized as a 33º Mason (the highest honor conferred by the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite), at a ceremony held at PRS on December 8th, despite never being initiated into the physical craft.

In his over 70-year career, Hall delivered approximately 8,000 lectures in the United States and abroad, authored over 150 books and essays, and wrote countless magazine articles.

http://www.manlyphall.org/

http://www.prs.org/

 

Magnetic Storms Affect Humans As Well As Telecommunications

This January 19, 2012 image provided by NASA shows an M3.2 solar flare captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). An earth-directed coronal mass ejection was associated with the solar flare. NASA's Space Weather Services estimated that it traveled at over 630 miles per second and reached the Earth on January 21, when strong geomagnetic storms and aurora were observed. AFP PHOTO/HANDOUT/ NASA/SDO      = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / NASA/SDO  " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = (Photo credit should read HO/AFP/Getty Images)

It has long been established that magnetic storms not only affect the performance of equipment, upset radio communications, blackout radars, and disrupt radio navigation systems but also endanger living organisms. They change the blood flow, especially in capillaries, affect blood pressure, and boost adrenalin.

The young and fit couldn’t care less, but those who are older, may develop problems. They have to consider the state of magnetosphere in their daily plans. Before, people were glued to weather forecasts. Now they are obsessed with the geomagnetic situation.

But what is a magnetic storm?

Shortly after the launch of the first satellites, mankind discovered the solar wind – a continuous flow of hot plasma from the solar corona. At a distance of 10-12 Earth’s radii in the direction of the Sun, where the energy of the solar wind equals that of the Earth’s magnetic field, solar wind particles change their direction, and flow around the Earth, forming a comet-like plasma vacuum — the magnetosphere. The size of its sophisticated but fairly stable structure depends on solar wind pressure, and hence, on solar activity.

The tail of the magnetosphere, which stretches for hundreds of thousands of kilometers in the direction opposite to the Sun, accumulates magnetic energy. From time to time, it is released in explosions, which heat up plasma, and create powerful electric currents (millions of amperes). When such bursts follow one another, the magnetosphere is filled to capacity with hot plasma, while its electric currents embrace the entire near-Earth space. These phenomena are referred to as magnetic storms.

The heart and cardio-vascular system have always been considered the main biological targets of geomagnetic activity. However, the damage inflicted by magnetic storms on human health has been found to be different. Experts from the Institute of Space Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Institute of Physics of the Earth (RAS), and the Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy have established that the biggest danger emanates from the micro variations of the geomagnetic field, which coincide with the heartbeat. They occur in about half of all magnetic storms, and are most typical for a prelude to a storm with insignificant changes in the geomagnetic field (mostly affecting high altitudes), and for the recovery phase, when the geomagnetic field is coming back to normal.

Medical statistics for Moscow show that 70% of all micro variations, caused by geomagnetic disturbances, are accompanied by an abnormally high incidence of heart attacks (a growth of about 13%), and blood-strokes (7.5% growth). The low and extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields destabilize the heartbeat, leading to a sudden death or infarction. Medical experts have finally explained why heart attacks take a heavy toll before a magnetic storm – because micro variations begin 24 hours before the storm.

“We have analyzed numerous data on the heartbeat of cosmonauts from all Soyuz crews, and the majority of missions to the Mir Station and the International Space Station,” said Doctor Tamara Breus (Physics and Mathematics) from the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Space Studies, who heads of a group of physics and physicians, studying this problem.

“We subjected 45 cosmonauts to examination during landing and flights of various duration, when they were exposed to geomagnetic disturbance, and then studied the same parameters in a neutral situation,� he said.

“The influence of a magnetic storm was obvious. It was manifest in a change of pulse and blood pressure, vegetative disorders, reduction of heartbeat rate variability and the power of respiratory undulations, and in a more irregular heartbeat pattern. Reactions varied depending on the duration of the flights and an ability of cosmonauts to adapt themselves to the new environment.”

In the opinion of Dr. Breus, these effects were a reaction of the vascular tonus and heartbeat rhythm to magnetic storms.

It is perfectly obvious that the response of such a complicated system as the human organism to external factors largely depends on its condition. A magnetic storm is not dangerous for healthy people.

But there are risk groups with unstable biological status. These include people suffering from ischemic disorders or hypertension, or children whose adaptation system is the process of formation. Newly born are particularly at risk.

“We think that simply forecasting storms is counterproductive because people merely get scared as a result,” said Dr. Breus. “But steady micro variations are different. We should concentrate on this in forecasting geomagnetic disturbances.”

What is the situation with forecasts today?

Owing to the research, conducted under the comprehensive program of Interbol, scientists better understand the nature of cause-and-effect connections in the near and remote space, which helps them develop the methods of space weather forecasts, that is, distance and time variations of space parameters caused by solar activity.

Since 1994, Russia has been implementing its KORONAS program (Comprehensive Orbital Near-Earth Monitoring of Solar Activity) with a series of space vehicles. The third satellite – KORONAS-Foton – will be launched under the program in 2007.

Continuous monitoring of the solar wind is critical for space weather forecasts. The Chibis micro satellites, which are being developed by the Institute of Space Studies, will be working to this end in low-orbit ionosphere in the near future.

Space vehicles of the Institute’s another project – Resonans – will do the monitoring in the internal magnetosphere, and the radiation belts. One more satellite – probably the same Chibis – will stay at the top – in the so-called libration point at a distance of about one and a half million kilometers from the Earth.

The gravitational forces of the Earth and the Sun are essentially in balance at this point, and for this reason a space vehicle may “linger on” for a long time near the Sun-Earth line, along which harmful solar corona ejections move, timely reporting the emergence of dangerous solar bursts.

To receive an earlier warning, a space vehicle may be “removed” even further from the Earth. Researchers from the Institute of Space Studies have developed a project called Klipper (not to be confused with a new Russian re-usable piloted spaceship), which provides for placing micro satellites at a distance of 3 to 4 million kilometers from the Earth in the Sunward direction.

This is twice further than the libration point. “Excessive” gravitation of the Sun (compared to the libration point) will be compensated for by the pressure of sunlight on a sail made of fine metallic-like coating on board the satellites. In this way, researchers will be able to stabilize the satellites at a certain point in space, or move them closer to the Sun by handling the reflecting sail.

In other words, they will manipulate the reflecting powers of the material from which it is made. For instance, if a liquid-crystal fiber is installed between a source of light (the Sun in this case), and the sail, it is possible to change the transparency of the fiber by putting it under electric voltage (or removing it).

Its reflecting powers may be changed from mirror reflection to total absorption. This will affect the pressure of light on the sail, causing a change in the direction and speed of the satellite’s movement in space.

A project of solar research at a closer distance – Intergeliozond – is designed for a more remote perspective. It will make it possible to see the Sun’s polar zones, which are invisible from the Earth.

 

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